Tag Archives: ARC

The Final Mission of Extortion 17

The Final Mission of Extortion 17: Special Ops, Helicopter Support, SEAL Team Six, and the Deadliest Day of the U.S. War in Afghanistan
by Ed Darack
(c) 2017
Published by Smithsonian Books

Rating: ❶❷❸❹❺  5 of 5 stars

The author presents glimpses into the background, training, and motivation of some of those on the final mission. This really drew me into the book and made me want to keep reading.

The book covers not only the final mission of Extortion 17, but also some of the lead-up to the mission. The author explains the many military acronyms in a straightforward way that helped me grasp their importance to the narrative, if not their full importance in the wider military setting.
A list of abbreviations and acronyms is provided.

Photos and maps accompany the chapters.

The Sources section briefly describes how the information for each chapter was obtained.

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in military aviation, recent history, and modern military.

I was provided with an uncorrected proof of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to Smithsonian Books.

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Deadly Lies

Deadly Lies
by Chris Collett
Genre: Mystery
Published 9/29/17 by Joffe Books

①❷③④⑤      2 of 5 stars

DI Tom Mariner investigates the death of investigative reporter Eddie Barham, an apparent suicide – except it’s not suicide.  PC Tony Knox assists with the investigation. Witness to the death is Jamie, severely autistic, also sibling to Anna and the deceased.  Anna Barham, sister of the victim, takes on the care of Jamie while trying to find why her brother was murdered.

Overall impression: The premise drew me in, and I enjoyed the twists and turns as the investigation progressed. The pace increases dramatically toward the conclusion.

What I like:

  • The premise: the only one who could say what happened…can’t say what happened.
  • The Brocken Spectre (you’ll have to read the book to see how it applies).
  • Snappy observations are sprinkled through the book. My favorite is when Anna first meets DI Mariner, whose recent nose injury makes his speech sound a bit thick, and “Anna had to fight a bizarre urge to pinch her nose and respond in the same way.”
  • Good opening sentence: the who and the what are identified, but not the back story which would have bogged down the opening.
  • Short chapters. New info, red herrings, changes of perspective are all moved along very well in chapters that are quickly read.  Also, the chapter endings are good: they made me want to turn the page right away and get to the next part.

What I don’t like:

  • DI Mariner, Anna Barham, PC Knox
  • Is this story a treatise on autism and medication, or a mystery? Difficult to tell. It’s labeled mystery.
  • DI Mariner jumps to conclusions. How does a newspaper story that is “personal” to its author bend itself in Mariner’s mind to be about “personal services”?
  • The story reads like it was hastily abridged: answers are sometimes announced before the evidence is introduced.
  • Anna’s brother Eddie took care of Jamie for years. When Anna assumes care of Jamie, she starts from scratch learning his favorite foods, etc. Why didn’t she just check Eddie’s cupboards to see what he stocked for Jamie?
  • Too much detail that doesn’t relate to the story. While the detail does establish the characters’ experience and mindset, the reader doesn’t need that much detail to get the picture.

Thank you to Joffe Books and NetGalley for an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

IQ

IQ
By Joe Ide

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, Fiction

Rating:  ❶❷❸④⑤

Copyright October 2016 by Mulholland Books

Atone for your errors and misdeeds. Use your brain and your talents to make of yourself something you like and respect, no matter what your circumstances are. Although the story takes a winding route to get there, the messages get through.

IQ (Isaiah Quintabe) takes on cases in high crime areas that would otherwise go unhandled: abuse of children, kidnapping, etc. He is intelligent, quiet, thoughtful, perceptive…a likeable protagonist. Some of his clients are less likeable – mostly the ones who have the money to pay the bills.

What I like:
The moniker IQ, short for Isaiah Quintabe.
Marcus.

What I don’t like:
The dialogue is less than believable.

IQ makes for an interesting, unusual character, one with the potential to improve with each successive book if this becomes a series.

Thank you to Mulholland Books and NetGalley for an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Far Away

Far Away by Victoria Blake
Troubador Publishing Ltd / Matador
(c) 2015
Genre: History, Fiction

Rating: * * *

Two soldiers captured in Africa in WWII meet in an Italian prison camp. Along the homeward journey, they write journals: one a memoir, the other a fairy tale. Interspersed with the soldiers’ story is the story of the soldiers’ grown children years later, unraveling the war experience they didn’t hear firsthand from their parents.

What I like about this story: I knew next to nothing about Italy or the Italians during WWII, and this book filled in some details.

Thank you to NetGalley and Troubador Publishing for the copy I received in exchange for an honest review.

I Hear a Red Crayon

RedCrayon

I Hear a Red Crayon: a Child’s Perspective of Her Brother’s Autism
by Bonnie Feuer
(c) October 2015
The Connecticut Press and Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA)
Genre:  Children’s Nonfiction

Rating:  * * * *

A combination of the title and the cover image drew me to this book about a girl growing up with an autistic brother.

The illustrations really make this book work:  I felt an instant connection with the confusion and disorder as well as the breakthrough moments of joy and understanding through the black-and-white images.

While the text may appeal mostly to older kids and young adults, the illustrations make the book equally – or perhaps even more – accessible for younger children.

Thank you to NetGalley, The Connecticut Press, and IBPA for the Advance Reader Copy I received in exchange for an honest review.

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Dear Mister Essay Writer Guy

Dear Mister Essay Writer Guy
Advice and Confessions on Writing, Love, and Cannibals

by Dinty W. Moore
Ten Speed Press (c) 2015
Nonfiction (Adult)

Rating: * * * *

What a riot! The questions sent to Mister Essay Writer Guy are giggle-worthy, the responses are snort-worthy, and the essays that follow leave me laughing long after I’ve finished (re-)reading them.

In the vein of Ben Franklin’s infamous letter to his (former) friend Mr. Strahan which was signed,
You are now my enemy, –
And I am, –
Yours.
B. Franklin
.

This is the kind of book to pick up in a durable format, the better to stand up to frequent use.

Thank you to Ten Speed Press and NetGalley for the Advance Reader Copy I received in exchange for an honest review.

At Home in Last Chance

At Home in Last Chance (A Place to Call Home #3) by Cathleen Armstrong

Rating: * * * *

I love this book!

Kaitlyn has made her mistakes, but if you think you get to rub her nose in ’em, you got another think comin’. And then there’s feckless Steven, with a definite penchant for putting his foot in his mouth. I tut-tutted right along with Steven’s grandmother, watching Kaitlyn and Steven bump their way past the misunderstandings and ruffled feathers to a very satisfying ending.

I will definitely be adding this book to my collection.  If you like this book, you may also enjoy The First Boy I Loved by Cheryl Reavis.

Thank you to Revell Publishing and NetGalley for the Advance Reader Copy I received in exchange for an honest review.

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The Godforsaken Daughter

The Godforsaken Daughter by Christina McKenna
March 2015, Lake Union Publishing

Rating: * *

Nicely stitched together. Quite an unusual set of circumstances leads to the intersection between Ruby, Jamie, and Henry in a little town in Northern Ireland.

The incidental characters like the attorney who reads the will are so neatly drawn I can see them clearly in my minds eye.

The main characters have victim written all over them, which is the reason I rate the book 2 stars. The sundry side characters, however, are enormously entertaining and prevent the story from sliding into melancholy. Were they the main characters, I’d rate this 4 stars.

Thank you to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for the copy I received in exchange for an honest review.

As the Crow Flies

As the Crow Flies (DI Nick Dixon Book One) by Damien Boyd

Pub. 1/20/2015
Thomas & Mercer
Rating: * * *

Detective Inspector Nick Dixon suspects his former climbing partner’s death is not the accident it initially appears to be. Drawn into the investigation, he learns his friend had become involved in illegal activities with dangerous and unscrupulous associates. The body count rises as Dixon unravels the web of lies and cover-ups.

As the Crow Flies holds the interest and moves along quickly. The other investigations in the story – Dixon’s day job – are every bit as interesting as the climbing death investigation (perhaps more so). The ending plays out differently than I anticipated.

Thank you to Thomas & Mercer and NetGalley for the copy I received in exchange for a review.

Hello from the Gillespies

Hello from the Gillespies by Monica McInerney

Release date: 11/04/14 by Penguin Group/Signet

Rating: * * * *

The truth shall set you free. 

The Gillespies are not having a good year.  Angela Gillespie avoids the usual sugarcoating in her annual Christmas missive, opting instead for flat truth.  The resulting unintended consequences create a humorous, touching story.

We could all benefit from a friend as loyal and practical as Joan.  Ig is a great kid, my favorite person throughout the story. Between the two of them, they fiercely shield Angela from the backlash of telling it like it is.  Joan makes clear the expectation that each person (including Angela) will take responsibility for their own choices.

I was taken aback at the length of the book: it shouldn’t take 600+ pages to tell a story.  However, I found the book easy to read, not necessarily a quick read but the story moves right along in a satisfying progression.  I will look for more by this author.

Thank you to Penguin/Signet and NetGalley for the Advance Reader Copy I received in exchange for a review.

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