Tag Archives: humor

MacGyver as 007

One of the many reasons MacGyver is a perennial favorite:

Scrutinizing his tux-clad appearance in the mirror, he decides with satisfaction that he feels like “Bond. James Bond.”

And then he attempts to flatten his cowlick.

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Liquid gold

Chuckle for the day: drool-worthy ad for pasteurized processed cheese food… in a “healthy” cooking magazine.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

alexie

by Sherman Alexie
Art by Ellen Forney

Rating:  ◊◊◊◊♦ 5 stars

Junior, 14 years old and living on a reservation, attends an all-white school in a neighboring town.
Imagine the issues!

I howled with laughter at the cartoons. This is a quick read.  For me, the cartoons tell the story and the words fill in the gaps. The cartoons bumped my rating from 4 to 5 stars.

Employing wit and imagination, Alexie touches on bullying, racism, poverty, etc. – without belaboring it. The point isn’t to immerse the reader in the problems, but to follow Junior through them to his next challenge.

This is the only Alexie book I have read, and probably the only one I will read. But I will almost certainly read this one several times.

If you like this book, you may also enjoy Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt and Rez Road Follies by Jim Northrup.

Unforgettable

unforgettable

Unforgettable: A Son, a Mother, and the Lessons of a Lifetime
By Scott Simon

Genre: Memoir
Rating: * * * * (4 of 5)
Copyright 3/31/2015 by Flatiron Books

This book sounds in print just the way Scott Simon sounds on air.

Simon projects a thoughtfulness and poignancy on air which comes through exactly the same way in this memoir and tribute to his mother, her life, and the incredible bond they shared.

It is little wonder that Simon’s reporting balances facts with whimsy and humor, given the example his mother set for him:
“Write thank-you notes. Tip well. Sing. Drink responsibly. Remember that good manners cost nothing, and open doors. Reach out to someone who is lonely. Make them laugh. Help people smile.”

P.S. What a terrific photo on the cover of the book!

The World’s Strongest Librarian

Librarian

The World’s Strongest Librarian
A Memoir of Tourette’s, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family
by Josh Hanagarne
audiobook read by Stephen R. Thorne

Rating: * * * *

Not a wasted moment drawing the listener into this audiobook!

What did he do with all the arms?  Gotta love this kid, I was thinking through helpless laughter as the author relayed his quite logical childhood reaction to the story of a warrior smiting his enemies by lopping off their arms, this kind of pragmatism has got to bode well.

By the time the author bestowed upon his symptoms a name of their own: Misty (after all, they took on a personality all their own) I was totally hooked, and I remained that way through his long journey of learning to cope with Tourette’s.

Dear Mister Essay Writer Guy

Dear Mister Essay Writer Guy
Advice and Confessions on Writing, Love, and Cannibals

by Dinty W. Moore
Ten Speed Press (c) 2015
Nonfiction (Adult)

Rating: * * * *

What a riot! The questions sent to Mister Essay Writer Guy are giggle-worthy, the responses are snort-worthy, and the essays that follow leave me laughing long after I’ve finished (re-)reading them.

In the vein of Ben Franklin’s infamous letter to his (former) friend Mr. Strahan which was signed,
You are now my enemy, –
And I am, –
Yours.
B. Franklin
.

This is the kind of book to pick up in a durable format, the better to stand up to frequent use.

Thank you to Ten Speed Press and NetGalley for the Advance Reader Copy I received in exchange for an honest review.

Going Commando

Going Commando by Mark Time

Going Commando

Going Commando

February 2014, Troubador Publishing

Rating: * * * *

Hilarious, absurd, and impossible to put down!

Thank you, author Mark Time, for recommending this selection.

Norwegian by Night

Norwegian

Norwegian by Night By Derek B. Miller
(c) 2012. First US edition 2013

Rating: * * * * *

Norwegian by Night is full of unexpected little gems like a magic dust bunny carefully transported in a hobo pack.

A grumpy old man living in an unfamiliar world rescues a traumatized little boy from his mother’s abuser. Meanwhile, we ponder. What is dementia, and who decides if someone has it? What and who are family? If we talk to someone who isn’t standing beside us, does that mean he isn’t there?

Is this an adventure story? An account of an existence heavily defined by being Jewish?  A tale about relationships and our expectations of others? A commentary on the after-effects of war? A treatise on aging? A sweet story of caring for a child one has just met? Yes.

I can’t say what drew me to this book. Not the cover picture, although that has a charm all its own. Suffice it to say that the books I find hardest to explain are the ones I most enjoy.

If you like this book, you may also enjoy The Last Ferryman by Gregory Randle.

Superior Justice

Superior Justice, a Lake Superior Mystery
by Tom Hilpert
(c) 2008 Tom Hilpert

Rating: * * * *

Daniel Spooner died on a Tuesday in early May, just as the lunch hour was ending in Grand Lake.

The lunch hour part made me chuckle and ensured I would continue reading. And what a fun read this is!

Meet Rev. Jonah Borden, Lutheran pastor in a small town on Minnesota’s North Shore, who fuels his day with copious amounts of coffee and gourmet food and listens to rock music and goes fishing as often as time permits.

Jonah cracks wise as he tries to help clear a man he knows to be innocent of a vigilante murder, only to find himself charged with murder. And other unscrupulous dealings.

Superior Justice is thoroughly entertaining and a quick read.

Beautiful things with bacon

A cookbook author was recently heard on public radio gushing about a local restaurant that does “beehyoooootifullll things with bayyykin.”

Have you ever noticed that cookbook authors and public radio speakers (both hosts and guests) have a great deal in common when it comes to descriptions and pronunciations? The first requirement is hyperbole.  The second is that a great deal of words must be used to say next to nothing.

Throughout my years of listening to public radio I have identified a few key phrases for anyone looking to get into the business. It is my contention that one cannot pass the test to go on the radio as either a public radio host/guest or a cookbook author without employing these phrases, preferably layered one upon another.

Sort of
This very
Very sort of
Beeyoooootifullll
Kind of
Nearly anything ending in “y” or “ly”
[various ooh and aah exclamations]

A perfect audition sentence would be, “It’s this beautiful, this very sort of…um…I don’t know, just oh! so yummy bit of yummy, creamy goodness with this kind of crunchy, sort of crumbly finish to it.”

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