Tag Archives: journalism

Superior Justice

Superior Justice, a Lake Superior Mystery
by Tom Hilpert
(c) 2008 Tom Hilpert

Rating: * * * *

Daniel Spooner died on a Tuesday in early May, just as the lunch hour was ending in Grand Lake.

The lunch hour part made me chuckle and ensured I would continue reading. And what a fun read this is!

Meet Rev. Jonah Borden, Lutheran pastor in a small town on Minnesota’s North Shore, who fuels his day with copious amounts of coffee and gourmet food and listens to rock music and goes fishing as often as time permits.

Jonah cracks wise as he tries to help clear a man he knows to be innocent of a vigilante murder, only to find himself charged with murder. And other unscrupulous dealings.

Superior Justice is thoroughly entertaining and a quick read.

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Quiet Magic

Quiet Magic by Sam Cook, with illustrations by Bob Cary

University of Minnesota Press

This book is exactly what it promises: quiet and magical.  It’s a collection of stories and essays the author wrote for the Duluth News-Tribune, grouped by season.  Each piece is 2-4 pages in the book: a nice little morsel.

Each piece is 2-4 pages of observations and experiences related to the north country, the people to be found there, hunting and fishing, canoeing, etc.  Cook’s gentle humor and perception make for a delightful few minutes of reading per story.

I find myself continually returning to Loomis Lips for the chuckle factor.  Without spoiling it, I’ll just note that it’s about human nature.  Oh, and fish.

Ely Echoes

Ely Echoes by Bob Cary
(c) 2000
Published by Pfeifer-Hamilton

Rating: * * * * *

“Jackpine Bob” Cary, journalist and long-time editor of the Ely Echo, has collected a series of observations, escapades, and spoofs spanning his Depression-era youth through his golden years into an anthology of several-page stories infused with his trademark humor and energy.

My absolute favorite of these – and let me assure you it was not easy to select just one favorite to write about – is Second Time Around, a hilarious chronicle of Cary’s less-than-smooth wedding and honeymoon trip at age 76 with 64-year-old longtime friend and new bride Edith.

How to Escape the Claws of the Grammar Police

How to Escape the Claws of the Grammar Police.

The Trial of Dr. Kate

The Trial of Dr. Kate (Round Rock #2) by Michael E. Glasscock III

Rating:  * * *

Shenandoah returns to the home of her youth to support childhood friend Dr. Kate Marlow and to write a newspaper article about the doctor’s arrest and upcoming trial for the murder of one of her patients.  Set in 1952, The Trial of Dr. Kate explores social class structure in a small community in Tennessee through the eyes of a woman who escaped the bounds of her dirt-poor youth to become an independent working woman, a WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots), then a college-educated newspaper reporter.

This is an OK book, a quick read.  It skirts some heavy issues – homophobia, sexism, alcoholism, racism, political maneuvering – without fleshing them out.  There are a few anachronisms in speech, but nothing I find jarring.  My only big beef is that the husband of the deceased patient doesn’t speak out until…well, you’ll see what I mean when you read the book.

If you like Nicholas Sparks’ books, you may also like this book.

I received an advance reader copy from NetGalley.

Coincidence Detection, a Jane Wilkinson Mystery

Coincidence Detection, a Jane Wilkinson Mystery by Selaine Henriksen-Willis

Rating:  * * * *

Jane Wilkinson, PI, would rather read than do almost anything else.  When investigating, she uses whatever story she is currently reading as a personal sounding board to note what resonates with her, allowing her detection skills and her intuition to work together.  When a character from the book pops into her head during an investigation, she makes note of it and explores the parallels between the character and the investigation, and why she is reading what she is reading into the book.  Her intuition draws her to parts of the story which ultimately help her solve the case.  “It works for her.”

I look forward to further books in the Jane Wilkinson series.  (None published at this time, to my knowledge.)

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